Master & Cmd-R

BGInfo errors in LogMeIn?

We’ve started seeing this error message on quite a few of the servers that we log into remotely – given that the error message talks about permissions and group policy, I started looking in that direction trying to find what had changed. The problem turned out to have nothing to do with group policy or user rights, but a setting in LogMeIn!
When you log into a server through LogMeIn, you get this error message:



I have verified that the problem occurs on a server through LogMeIn, but connecting to that same server with RDP will not throw up an error, and BGInfo fires just fine.
Thankfully, the fix is simple: Once you have the server selected, click on Preferences, then General:


Under the Remote Control option, uncheck the box to Disable wallpaper and user interface effects on host computer.

Hit Apply, and then go back to Remote Control and remind LogMeIn and BGInfo that yes, I am Yo’ Daddy!

 


Removing uninstalled (missing) devices in Device Manager

Thanks to Rob for this great tip – I had no idea this was possible, so hopefully there’s others out there who will find this useful!

When you physically uninstall a device in Windows, the device drivers are often not uninstalled and will remain in your Device Manager, even though it’s no longer visible. Removing the drivers for these ghosted devices can clear up a lot of weird issues caused by driver conflicts, or more importantly, prevent issues from occurring in the first place.

Up to this point, my standard procedure to remove these old drivers was to reboot the machine in Safe Mode, which allows you to see all devices and drivers installed on the machine, even if they’re no longer present. This of course has the downside of taking extra time, as you now need to reboot to get into Safe Mode, and then reboot one more time to get back out again. And with servers being what they are, this can sometimes add as much as half an hour to what is probably a fairly simple hardware upgrade.

Here it is…

Your first step is to open up a command prompt, and type in the following:

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Starting the Device Manager from this command prompt is essential, as the command to show the missing devices only does it for that instance – if you leave this command prompt to open Device Manager it won’t show them!

Once Device Manager is open, click on View-Show hidden devices. In this case, we’re going to be removing an uninstalled Network adapter, so the only one that’s showing in the screenshot below is the one that is currently installed.

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Voila! Along with some other hidden devices, we find the network adapters that were uninstalled.

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(This is what Show hidden devices looks like if you haven’t run the command, or if you’ve mistakenly opened your Device Manager a different way – not from the command prompt. Note that while we can see the standard hidden adapters, we don’t see the ghosted ones like we do above.)

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Now that we can see our ghosted devices, it’s a simple matter of right clicking on the device and uninstalling it:

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Click OK  to confirm:

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And you’re done! No need to worry about running another command to reverse this, because as soon as you close Device Manager it resets to its defaults of not showing ghosted devices.

About Me

My name is Jeremy, and I am a cloud addict.

I absolutely love technology that is available to me anywhere on (almost) any device – between Office 365 and OneDrive (and OneDrive for Business), Dropbox and Outlook.com, I am completely cloud enabled. My computer can die tonight and I will pick up on a new computer tomorrow without losing anything… come on! How awesome is that? My goal is to find and use platforms that are device agnostic – I should be able to pick up an iPad, Surface or Android tablet and be able to get at my data, my email, my photos, contacts and calendars without skipping a beat.

I’m a technology consultant and Office 365 Certified Administrator. I do what I love, and love what I do – provide and support technology solutions for a wide variety of clients and scenarios.

I focus primarily on on-premise server solutions utilizing Hyper-V, Windows Server 2012 (R2), SQL 2012, Exchange 2013, Lync 2013 & SharePoint 2013, or a cloud solution harnessing the power of Office 365 to get Exchange, Lync and SharePoint for a fraction of the cost of an on-premise deployment. Windows Azure, and Intune round out my toolkit and allow me to provide tailor-made solutions to my client’s needs.

I love utilizing the power of the command line for making technology dance and sing, hence the title of my blog. Join me as I explore this technology that I love so much and I promise to share new things that I’ve come across so we can all learn together!